Happy Birthday, Florence Nightingale!!!

Happy Birthday, Florence Nightingale!!!

Today we celebrate the life of Florence Nightingale, the mother of modern nursing who was born in Florence, Italy, on May 12, 1820. She was also called “The lady with the lamp” and was known for her contribution to her profession as a nurse.

Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing.

Her wealthy family did not support her choice of career. One doctor told her father, “Some of the nursing is done by drunken prostitutes who were given the option in the police courts of going to prison or to the hospital.” But she defied all odds to not just become successful at nursing but to revolutionize it entirely.

During the Crimean War, she and a team of nurses improved the unsanitary conditions at a hospital on a British base in Scutari, Turkey, greatly reducing the number of deaths.  She described in her journal the horrific conditions that greeted them. “We have four miles of beds eighteen inches apart. We are steeped to our necks in blood. Eleven men died in the night simply from exhaustion, which, humanly speaking, might have been stopped could I have laid my hand on such nourishment as I knew they ought to have had.” She and her nurses soon set up a diet kitchen, purchasing food for the soldiers from her own funds. Her next problem was the hospital laundry. Only six shirts were being washed per month for the thousand or more wounded because the rate of theft was high. Again, using her own money, she rented a nearby house, had boilers installed, and hired the soldiers’ wives to wash clothes. Then she purchased 10,000 shirts for the soldiers since they literally only had the shirts on their backs when they landed in the Crimea, thinking the war would only last one day. Florence made sure the old vermin infested blood soaked clothing was burned.

She was known to work for 20 hours without stopping for a rest. As she made her midnight rounds with her lantern, the soldiers saluted her in appreciation for all her care. Longfellow immortalized this nightly tour in his well known poem in which he speaks of Florence as “the lady with the lamp.”

Lo! In that hour of misery, A lady with a lamp I see

Pass through the glimmering gloom, And flit from room to room.

And slow, as in a dream of bliss, The speechless sufferer turns to kiss

Her shadow as it falls Upon the darkening walls.

After the war ended in 1856, she returned to England and was given a heroine’s welcome, much to her surprise. She insisted on compiling statistics to present to the government to improve the conditions for their soldiers. Seven times more men died from disease than from battle wounds. She won her battle with Parliament, and in 1858 they provided the funds to ventilate and heat the barracks, introduce a sewer system, remodel the kitchens, and use gas lights rather than candles. To safeguard the soldiers’ moral health, she built reading and recreational rooms, coffee shops, and lecture halls.

In 1859, she published her Notes on Nursing which became an international bestseller worldwide.  Her Notes on Nursing were used to guide the nurses during the Civil War in the United States which began in 1860.

In appreciation for all the lives of the wounded British soldiers that she and her team of nurses treated, Queen Victoria awarded her $250,000. Florence used this money to establish St. Thomas’ Hospital and the Nightingale Training School for Nurses in London in 1860. Fifteen students were admitted to the school on the condition that they would serve in public hospitals and infirmaries.

She was an invalid the last 40 years of her life, but she wrote and published a number of papers during that time. She reflected, “Wretch that I was not to see that God taking from me all human help in order to compel me to lean on Him alone. O Lord, even now I am trying to snatch the management of Thy world out of Thy hands… Too little have I looked for something better and higher than Thy work, the work of Supreme Wisdom… O God, to Thy glory, not to mine, whatever happens, may be all my thought.”

“Whether, therefore, ye eat, or drink, or whatever ye do, do all to the glory of God…not seeking mine own profit, but the profit of many, that they may be saved.” I Corinthians 10:31, 33

The “Lady with the lamp” died in London, on Aug. 13, 1910 and was buried in a simple family grave as she requested.

(All quotes taken from “Florence Nightingale” by Basil Miller, Bethany House Publishers, 1947, 1975)

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Christ is Risen!

Easter

I hope you have a blessed Easter worshiping our wonderful Savior, Jesus Christ! This week, I will share the precious simple good news from the Bible and a few photos from my journey to Israel in 2013. It was truly the trip of a lifetime! If you ever have an opportunity to visit Israel, by all means go. (I felt safer there than anywhere else I have visited in the world.)

“For I delivered unto you first of all that which I also received, that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures; and that He was buried, and that He rose again the third day according to the scriptures; and that He was seen of Cephas, then of the twelve. After that, He was seen of above 500 brethren at once. ” I Corinthians 15:3-6

“But these are written, that ye might believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that believing ye might have life through His name.” John 20:31

If you are unable to attend a good Bible church this Easter Sunday, I encourage you to go to http://www.ttb.org and listen to an Easter message by Dr. J. Vernon McGee.

Six day old donkey with shepherd.

Cross of Jesus

An empty tomb of a wealthy family from the time of Christ

Jerusalem Skyline

Rose of Sharon

Come Aside and Rest A While

Summer – 1976 – Midwest USA

I started out the summer working as a Nursing Assistant at Children’s Hospital where I had my clinical site last summer. They assigned me one day to the burn unit, and the nurse asked me to watch her change the burn dressings on a 2 year old so I could change them the next time. As a senior nursing student, they allowed me to do some procedures under close supervision. The little boy stood in his crib as she began to unwind his dressings. As the burned skin was exposed, his blood ran down his legs and arms and he began to scream. I felt myself begin to black out and turned and sank into a nearby chair and put my head on my knees. After the blackness cleared, I stood up and went out into the hallway. The nurse finished the dressings and came out into the hallway to speak with me. I said, “I’m so sorry, but I thought I was going to faint. I have never witnessed anything like that before.” She said she understood and told the supervisor not to assign me to the burn unit again. They sent me back to the orthopedic unit where I was last summer. I guess I deal better with the kids in traction than the burned ones.

After 4 weeks of arising at 5 a.m. in order to catch the 6:30 a.m. bus to work, the dizziness, nausea, and weariness was almost unbearable. I could not smile at anyone and my soul was crying in agony to God. I felt like Elijah under the juniper tree crying out to God to take him home. (I Kings 19:4-7) My Pastor was very concerned about me and asked me to take a walk with him before church Sunday night. “Pam, I think you are so rigid right now and have planned everything so much that God can’t work. Let go, and let God do whatever He wants! For one week, don’t plan anything. Take every day as it comes and do everything the opposite you usually do. Go out to a restaurant and eat a meal, listen to the birds, take long walks in the woods. Don’t study your Bible for one week except to read a few verses in the morning.  It will make you a better Bible student in the long run.”

His words were quite a shock to me, but I was willing to try anything since I had lost all joy in the Lord. The next weekend, I drove up to see Jane for one night and we went hiking at the state park. I had to stop every 30 feet to rest a little. When I awoke on Monday, I was still so dizzy and exhausted that I called in sick. After praying about it the rest of the day, I decided I needed to resign and return to my parents’ home to rest the remainder of the summer. I called the head nurse and told her the situation, and she said she understood. After 7 quarters straight of school, with the last one in psychiatry and the demanding classes, my body was beyond exhausted.

My parents were very concerned about me also and were extremely kind to me. After two weeks of total rest, I began to feel like myself again and could smile and laugh! I just finished reading a little book by M. R. DeHaan MD called Broken Things. He said, “The Lord only breaks those whom He is going to make.” “Sunshine all the time makes a desert.” I understand better now that I don’t need to strive and push doors open, but just relax and let the Lord open or close the doors. His tenderness in giving me two months just to meditate and enjoy Him brings tears to my eyes.

My Dad kindly drove our travel trailer to the state park a couple hours away and set it up so my Mom and I could stay for the week while he returned to work. God has given my Mom and me very precious times together. I so enjoy walking through the woods, listening to the rustling leaves, and watching the butterflies and dragonflies fly from flower to flower. At night, the chirping crickets lull me to sleep, and the singing birds awaken me every morning. How I thank God for these precious blessings and restoring my health!

Camping at the State Park was so relaxing!

Camping at the State Park was so relaxing!

Reflection

Since 1976, I have had several other times in my life of total exhaustion when I have simply burned the candle at both ends and pushed my body too far.  As I read the passage in I Kings again about Elijah, he had just run for his life 93 miles to flee wicked Queen Jezebel who was trying to kill him! No wonder he was exhausted. After he said to God, “It is enough! Now, O Lord, take away my life; for I am not better than my fathers.” And as he lay and slept under a juniper tree, behold, an angel touched him and said unto him, Arise and eat. And he ate and then slept some more and ate some more. He was able to go 40 days and nights after that. Now I realize I am certainly not Elijah, but the cure was the same for me. Sleep and eat, sleep and eat.

The disciples were deeply grieving after burying their beloved friend, John the Baptist, who was beheaded by wicked King Herod. I love the passage in Mark 6:30-31 which says And the apostles gathered themselves together unto Jesus, and told Him all things, both what they had done, and what they had taught. And He said unto them, Come aside into a desert place, and rest a while; for there were many coming and going, and they had no leisure so much as to eat.” It’s so wonderful that our dear Savior sees when we need to rest and provides it for us!

trillium

Three petaled trillium wild flower reminds me of the Trinity!

If you would like to comment, have a question for me, or a prayer request, please feel free to contact me at pamela.aprn@gmail.com  Have a blessed week of looking unto Jesus!

A restful walk in the woods.

A restful walk in the woods.

Dialysis Nurse on the High Seas

January 1, 1991 – Caribbean Sea

10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1-  HAPPY NEW YEAR!!! blared the loudspeaker.

Dialysis Cruise Ship 1991

Cruise Ship 1991

I shot out of bed and stood in the middle of the pitch black room with my heart racing. Where was I? What was happening? Oh yes. I signed up to work as a dialysis nurse on this nine story cruise ship for the week, and my payment was a free cruise. I went to bed early because I took a Dramamine tablet for my motion sickness. I drowsily climbed back into bed to sleep until my alarm clock awoke me at 5:30 a.m.

At 6 a.m. I joined my cabin mate, Laura, and Tess, two other dialysis nurses, in the dialysis room in the lowest level of the ship. The dialysis company had rolled on three dialysis recliners and three ancient dialysis machines along with gallons of dialysis fluid. In addition to the fee for their cruise, nine patients had each paid the company $1200 to dialyze them three times during this week-long cruise so they could see some places outside the USA. Once they left the USA, Medicare no longer paid for their life saving treatments. People with End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) whose kidneys no longer cleaned their blood of toxins or removed fluids from their body needed 3-4 hours of dialysis three times weekly.

Our charge nurse, Ellen, divided us into two teams and assigned us to patients and times so we dialyzed only while cruising at sea. Therefore when we were in ports, patients and nurses were free to go ashore and sight see. The ship left Fort Lauderdale, Florida, then cruised to Key West, Jamaica, Grand Cayman, Cancun, Mexico and then returned to Florida on the seventh day.  I met the qualifications since I had now worked for three years on a large dialysis unit in the Midwest.

This is my first cruise. The seas are rolling, so I am suffering from motion sickness. I was blessed in reading Psalm 107:28-31: He makes the storm a calm, so that the waves thereof are still. Then are they glad because they are quiet; so He brings them unto their desired haven. Oh, that men would praise the Lord for His goodness, and for His wonderful works to the children of men!” Yes, the Lord is in charge of the seas and this ship. I thank Him for this opportunity to meet new people,  see new places, and relax in between dialysis sessions. Laura was on the ship last week also for Christmas and said it was so rough she had to go to the ship’s clinic to get a shot to stop her vomiting. She appears to have her sea legs now. Terra firma felt fantastic when Laura and I went ashore at the different ports! !

Key West Florida houses

Key West Florida houses

I climbed the rocks of Ocho Rios Falls in Jamaica in bare feet!

I climbed the rocks of Ocho Rios Falls in bare feet!

Parasailing in Grand Cayman

Parasailing in Grand Cayman

Pam with one of her patients using the old dialysis machine

Pam with one of her patients using the old dialysis machine

Laura showed me how to prime the old machines with saline and enter the amount of fluid to remove for each patient during their prescribed length of dialysis. They did not use the new computerized machines that I was familiar with because the rolling motion of the ship made the alarms go off too often. Our three patients arrived at 6:30 a.m. Our supervising dialysis doctor for this week was also a dialysis patient. I am not sure how ethical this was since he gave me his own orders for dialysis, but it was too late now to do anything about it. Dr. C. was a kind gentleman who also brought his wife and young children with him on the cruise. After he weighed in and we calculated the amount of fluid to remove over the next 3.5 hours, he asked me to take an extra half pound off so he could eat and drink more! I reluctantly entered the amount as he ordered me to do. I took a deep breath as the ship rolled and inserted two large needles into his fistula in his arm. We checked each patient’s blood pressure every 15 minutes and recorded it. Patients and staff chatted together in the small room as three hours slowly passed.

I checked Dr. C’s blood pressure, but it was too low at 70/50! I quickly put his recliner back so he was flat and stopped the machine from removing any more fluid from his body. “Dr C, I know you wanted to get extra fluid off, but I really want you to be with us on this cruise the entire week, so I am giving you 100 cc of intravenous fluid now (about 1/2 cup) to raise your blood pressure.” His face was pale. He didn’t argue with me. He completed the treatment and left with his blood pressure back up to his baseline of 110/80.

I snorkeled in Cozumel, Mexico.

I snorkeled in Cozumel, Mexico.

Laura shared with me that she was in her twenties, a new widow, and this was her first Christmas and New Year since her husband died. He was one of her dialysis patients who received a kidney transplant. But six weeks after they married, he had a complication and died suddenly. She said she couldn’t face being with her family and being pitied, so she chose to drown her sorrow in work on the cruise ship with total strangers. I prayed that she would know the wonderful comfort of the Lord Jesus Christ, “a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief.” Isaiah 53:3 

Reflection

That was my first and last cruise due to the severe seasickness which plagued me. Even to this day, when I recall that long week, I still become nauseated! I truly thank God that they now have prescription medicine for severe nausea (Zofran) and also Sea Bands (acupressure bracelets). The Sea Bands work fairly well to prevent motion sickness when I am on a plane or train. But when rough weather is predicted, I take Zofran 30 minutes before my flight as it is much easier to prevent it rather than treat it after it occurs.

When I was in Israel several years ago, I gazed over the calm Mediterranean Sea and recalled the Apostle Paul’s shipwreck from the violent sea (Acts 27:14-44) and Jonah’s tempestuous voyage when he was thrown overboard (Jonah 1:15). God sometimes takes us through great storms in our life to teach us to rest and trust Him in the midst of the storm. In John 16:33 Jesus said, These things I have spoken unto you, that in Me ye might have peace. In the world ye shall have tribulation: but be of good cheer; I have overcome the world.” I pray you will have a blessed New Year of looking unto Jesus and learning more of Him through the storms and the calm places in your life!

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The Mediterranean Sea when it is calm.

Jesus – Born in Bethlehem

“Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea in the days of Herod, the king, behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem, Saying, Where is He that is born King of the Jews? For we have seen His star in the east, and are come to worship Him.” Matthew:2:1-2

Bethlehem, Israel – March, 2013

25,000 people now reside in Bethlehem, Israel

25,000 people now reside in Bethlehem, Israel

Our tour group boarded our bus outside our hotel in Jerusalem and traveled 20 minutes to the city of Bethlehem which now has 25,000 residents. We drove past the huge cement wall built between Palestinian controlled Bethlehem and Jerusalem to prevent the Arab snipers from shooting them. At the checkpoint, the security guard waved us through after our driver told him we were American tourists. Our day to visit Bethlehem changed since President Obama was scheduled to visit here in three days. We parked in an underground garage and walked several blocks uphill to the Church of the Nativity, the traditional site where Jesus Christ was born in a cave. We passed Muslim women dressed head to toe in black, brown, or gray burkas.

Church of the Nativity

Church of the Nativity

Construction began in 326 A.D. on this oldest church in the Holy Land which is still in use. It is separated into three different sanctuaries of the Franciscan Catholics, Greek Orthodox, and Armenian Orthodox.

We entered through a four foot high door with a foot high wall at the bottom. Our guide told us they built it this short purposely as a deterrent to any enemies! "Mouse hole" entrance to Church of the Nativity!

“Mouse hole” entrance to Church of the Nativity!When an enemy entered all bent over, he couldn’t shoot anyone, but the person inside could knock him over or kill him easily.

Then we wandered from one sanctuary to the other. It was quite interesting to compare the different architectural styles, the Armenian one being the most ornate. We waited in line about 20 minutes to see the glass covered hole in the floor that is supposed to be the actual birthplace of Christ.

Traditional birthplace of Christ.

Traditional birthplace of Christ.

Our Hebrew Christian guide, told us that in 1948 when the State of Israel began, Bethlehem had all Christian residents, but now there are only about 40 families remaining. The Muslims won’t hire them, so all the Christian young people are leaving.

We went to a gift shop that an Arab Christian started to support these remaining families. The believers carve nativity scenes out of olive wood which are very intricate. I treasure the one I purchased that portrays Mary and Joseph gazing at the Christ child in the cave. I also learned the typical manger was made of stone, unlike the wooden mangers usually portrayed in the USA.

My olive wood nativity scene carved by Christians in Bethlehem.

My olive wood nativity scene carved by Christians in Bethlehem.

Reflection

As I recalled my days in Labor and Delivery helping those babies into the world on Christmas morning in 1981, I couldn’t help but wonder if anyone assisted Mary during her labor other than Joseph? It simply states in Luke 2:7  And she brought forth her first-born Son, and wrapped Him in swaddling clothes, and laid Him in a manger. This is what the midwife or nurse would typically do who assisted the mother.  Midwives are mentioned in Exodus 1:15-22 who feared God and preserved the Hebrew male babies from Pharaoh’s wrath. “Therefore God dealt well with the midwives; and the people multiplied, and became very mighty.” I do not think God gave any details about Mary’s labor or delivery because He wanted all the emphasis upon Jesus Christ, the Savior of the world.Nazareth shepherd

The common shepherds were the first ones who learned of the Savior’s birth and came to worship Him, their Creator, who “took upon Him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men; And, being found in fashion as a man, He humbled Himself and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross.” Philippians 2:7-8. Emmanuel, God with us, who left heaven above, and came to earth to be my Savior. Born to die. Thank You, Lord Jesus, that You love me so much!

Charles Wesley captured this thought beautifully in the fourth verse of “Hark, the Herald Angels Sing”.

Mild He lays His glory by, Born that man no more may die,

Born to raise the sons of earth, Born to give them second birth.

Hark, the herald angels sing, Glory to the newborn King!

I pray you all may have a Christ centered celebration of the birth of our dear Savior!

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Christmas Babies!

December 25, 1981 – 2 a.m. Labor & Delivery Staff Nurse

I finished my night shift orientation in September and am feeling much more comfortable in my skills as I don’t have to think so hard about every little thing! Since it is my first Christmas in Labor & Delivery, I am required to work and they designated me as charge nurse since the Assistant Nurse Manager is off tonight.

I glanced at the large white board in the nurse’s station which listed all the patients by name, stage of labor, and doctor. We still had six women in labor with four empty labor rooms. We had already done four deliveries since I was called in early at 9:30 p.m. to help the busy evening shift. I glanced at the fetal monitors which displayed each baby’s heart rate. All of a sudden, I saw one baby’s heart rate go dangerously low to 50 and stay there. A normal full-term baby’s heart rate is 120-160 beats per minute. Cathy, another nurse, stuck her head out the door of the woman’s room and yelled, “Call the doctor and nurse anesthetist, Pam! We have to do a stat C section (surgery). This baby is in trouble!”

The operating room technician, Teresa, ran to the prepared operating room (OR) while I called the two doctors. The nursing assistant helped Cathy wheel the huge bed down the hall to the O.R. Cathy had the mother lie on her left side to try and take the pressure of the baby’s body off her mother’s blood vessels so the baby could get more blood.

Newborn Baby!

Newborn Baby!

We worked quickly. As soon as the anesthesiologist nodded that the mother was asleep, the resident doctor cut her abdomen and lifted the baby out of her womb. He  cut the cord that was wrapped tightly around the baby girl’s neck, and carried her to the warmer. Her own cord had choked her as she came down the birth canal. The baby girl let out a weak whimper.  I suctioned out her mouth and placed the oxygen mask over her small face. I dried her off quickly and she took several gasps of air! I silently prayed, “Dear Lord, Please touch this baby girl’s body that she may live.”  She let out a louder cry and the delivery room staff exhaled a sigh of relief. Her tiny body began to turn pink. The Neonatal ICU nurse wheeled the baby girl down the hallway to keep a close eye on her until she stabilized.

I returned to my other patient, Marie, and checked her progress internally. She was ready to start pushing the baby out. She was totally exhausted after 16 hours of painful labor. After an hour of pushing, I saw a patch of the baby’s black hair peak out! We wheeled Marie in her bed down the hall to the delivery room, helped her transfer to the narrow delivery bed, placed her heels in the steel stirrups, and her hands on the steel handles. I had her husband, John, sit on a stool beside her.

She gave several more pushes, but wasn’t making much progress. Dr. D. instructed, “Pam, give fundal pressure during the next contraction to help her out.”  I looked at Marie over my mask and warned, ” I’m afraid this is going to hurt you.” As I felt her large abdomen harden, I reached across her, grabbed the steel handle with both my hands, and pressed my forearm into her belly with all my strength. She screamed and I felt like screaming as my back went into a muscle spasm. At last the baby’s head popped out and his slippery body slid into Dr. D’s hands.

“Congratulations, Marie and John! You have a nice big healthy boy!” announced Dr. D. I pulled the string on the Apgar clock and wrote down the time — 3:03 a.m. Christmas morning.  Dr. D.  quickly suctioned the mucus out of the baby’s mouth with the blue rubber bulb syringe, and the baby let out a loud strong cry. Dr D placed two clamps on the umbilical cord and laid him on Marie’s abdomen so she could see him. “John, would you like to cut your son’s cord?” “Sure!” grinned John as he took the sterile scissors in his hand and snipped the cord.

Dr. D. carried the baby to the warmer and the Apgar timer buzzed at one minute. I gave him a score of 8 out of 10 which was excellent! His trunk, hands, and feet were still tinged blue. I suctioned the mucus out of his mouth again, wiped off his body with the soft, warm, cotton blanket and put a little hat on his head to keep him warm. The 5 minute Apgar time buzzed and I scored him 9 out of 10. His body was now pink, but his hands and feet were still slightly blue. I wrapped him tightly in another clean warm blanket and greeted him, “Merry Christmas, Timothy! Welcome to the world!” John watched his new son with amazement.

A woman, when she is in travail, hath sorrow, because her hour is come; but as soon as she is delivered of the child, she remembereth no more the anguish, for joy that a man is born into the world. John 16:21

I carried Timothy over to Marie and placed him in her arms. All the fatigue vanished from her face as she gazed at him tenderly and kissed his forehead. After Dr. D. delivered her placenta and stitched her up, I put a warm blanket on her and wheeled mother and son to the recovery room.

The remaining hours flew by as we did two more Caesarian surgeries and two more normal deliveries. Eight babies were born that  Christmas night shift! I sat down twice for ten minutes during my ten hour shift. I was so happy to see the day shift staff walk into the nurse’s station at 7 a.m.! We gave them report, went to the locker room to change out of our blue scrubs into our street clothes, and walked wearily out the door into the bitterly cold Christmas morning sunshine.Christmas morning

Reflection

My severe back pain continued, and I was diagnosed with two injured back muscles. My doctor ordered me to take a month leave of absence while I went to physical therapy to heal and strengthen my muscles. He said I was in poor shape physically and needed to exercise regularly if I wanted to continue to work in labor and delivery. So I joined the local indoor pool and began swimming four times a week. I happily discovered that swimming was also a great stress reliever and helped me sleep better!

The babies that were born that early morning will celebrate their 35th birthday this Christmas and likely have children of their own by now. I wonder what kind of choices they have made in life? They share the same birthday that we celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ, King of Kings and Lord of Lords. I pray that each has chosen to receive Him as his/her personal Savior.

“For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Savior, who is Christ the Lord. And this shall be a sign unto you: Ye shall find the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes, lying in a manger.” Luke 2:11-12

Happy Thanksgiving!!

November 24, 2016 – Texas

Tomorrow, here in the United States, we celebrate my favorite holiday of the entire year – Thanksgiving! This is a unique holiday to the USA which remembers God’s goodness to the Pilgrims who came to Massachusetts in 1620 to escape religious persecution. Many of them died the first harsh winter, so when they had their first bountiful harvest, they thanked God with a huge feast which they shared with the native American Indians.

The First Thanksgiving

The First Thanksgiving

For a wonderful review of the history of this holiday, please go to this link: pilgrims1

On Sunday, after church here in Texas, I experienced the biggest Thanksgiving dinner ever with my brothers and sisters in Christ on a beautiful sunny warm day outside under the big tent. They roasted 25 turkeys to serve 400 people!

Thanksgiving dinner for 400 people! They roasted 25 turkeys in these huge smokers.

Thanksgiving dinner for 400 people! They roasted 25 turkeys in this huge smoker.

tx-thanksgiving-2016

I thank God today for His goodness in giving His only Son, Jesus Christ, to die on the cross in our place for our sins. Christ arose from the grave after three days and lives today for all eternity. How he wants each person to receive Him as their own Savior and be with Him for all eternity!

“For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.” Romans 6:23

“Enter into His gates with thanksgiving, and into His courts with praise: be thankful unto Him, and bless His name. For the Lord is good; His mercy is everlasting; and His truth endures to all generations.” Psalm 100:4-5