Blizzard of 1978

January 26, 1978 – 10 a.m.

I turned on the TV and watched the weather prediction. They told us to brace ourselves for a terrible storm that was coming with high winds. We usually only get 10-15 inches of snow all winter, so this was very unusual. I have never seen a blizzard. It’s about 50 degrees Fahrenheit right now. The wind began to pick up, the snow began to fall, and the temperature plunged.

The phone rang and I answered it. My nursing supervisor, Marie said, “Pam, pack a bag to prepare to stay overnight at the hospital. The National Guard will be at your house in 30 minutes to bring you in for the evening shift tonight.” I quickly packed a couple extra uniforms, toiletries, and my Bible, and watched out my front window. When I saw a 4 wheel drive Jeep pull up, I put on my warmest hooded coat and ventured out. I had to lean into the wind,because it was so difficult to walk. I climbed in the back seat and said hello to the driver and three other nurses he had already picked up.

We drove slowly through the deepening snow on the deserted streets and arrived safely at the hospital five miles away. I took report from day shift and began my evening rounds. My head nurse, Mrs. H. and I were the only staff that made it in for evening shift. Thankfully, they had cancelled all routine surgeries, but all our 30 beds were occupied. There was a friendly air of comradery with all the patients that night. Those who were there for their week of diabetes classes helped us pass dinner trays to the patients who were bedbound.

I went down to the cafeteria for dinner, and was amazed to have the hospital administrator serve us our food on the tray line. He smiled and thanked me for working through the blizzard. No charge for dinner tonight!

The Guard brought in the night shift nurse and aide, so I was thankful to sign off at 11:30. Marie told us there were some empty patient rooms on the 9th floor, and to pick whichever one I wanted. I grabbed my bag, found an empty room, and closed the door. I turned on the TV and watched the blizzard. I watched the unbelievable pictures of 15 foot snowdrifts from the high winds of 69 miles per hour. The roads were nearly impassable and the temperature had dropped to -30 degrees Fahrenheit. I could hear the howling wind as I looked through the window and watched the snow blow sideways in the dim street light. It was nearly a whiteout!

I put on my pajamas and climbed into bed. I had never been a patient in a hospital, so this was a very strange experience. I was too wound up to sleep. Then I heard a patient in the next room start to scream. I lay awake and prayed.

The alarm went off at 6 a.m. I guess I dozed off at some point. I got dressed, read my Bible, and committed the day to the Lord. I went out to the nurses’ station and asked my nurse friends about the patient next to me. They said he was an alcoholic going through withdrawal. They had to put his arms and legs in leather restraints, but he broke out of the restraints and nearly destroyed the room. Finally the medications took effect and he slept.

I went down to the cafeteria and ate my free breakfast and then went back to the fifth floor. I was totally exhausted from little sleep and asked the Lord to give me strength for the day and to bring in the evening shift. Mrs. H and I were the only staff again so we split the floor in half. After we passed the medications and trays, we began the bed baths. We were running out of linens so we only changed the patient’s gown and sheets if they looked soiled. I was so happy when the evening shift arrived courtesy of the National Guard! I gave report, and then found a coworker who lived near me and volunteered to give me a ride home.

I could barely get in my front door from the drifts. My roommate, Jane, had shoveled out as much as she could. We looked at our cars that were buried in the parking lot and decided to wait until the next day to shovel them out since we were both off of work.

My car was buried after the Blizzard of 1978!

My car was buried after the Blizzard of 1978!

I fell into bed after a quick supper, thanked the Lord for carrying me safely through the blizzard, and fell into a deep sleep.

God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble.

Psalm 46:1

 

Reflection

That was the only time that I  needed the National Guard to bring me to work. Sadly, 51 people died in my state in the blizzard of 1978; 22 died when they left their trapped car and froze to death while trying to get to cover.  But I still remember the comradery of the staff and patients as we all helped each other through that terrible storm.

I survived several more blizzards during the years I lived in New England. Later in the blog, I will share some of my harrowing tales of reaching my patients in the community as a visiting nurse.

 

Advertisements

Lord, Be My Vision

January 18, 2006

I’m having trouble with my eyesight again. I pulled out my pocket eye card and could only see 20/200 with my left eye and my glasses on. This means I have to be at 20 feet to see what most people can see at 200 feet. My right eye is better at 20/25. Through all of this, I want to rest in the Lord. He knows all about my eyes and is in control. If I go blind like my uncle, God will continue to provide for me like He always has through the years. I am so glad that He goes before me.

January 27, 2006

The retinal specialist said my eye looked healthy on the inside, so he is not sure why my vision has decreased so much. He decided to review my head scan from a year ago when I fell and was unconscious for awhile. He also is sending me for a second opinion to another retinal specialist.

February 11, 2006

I will instruct you and teach you in the way which you should go; I will guide you with My eye. Psalm 32:8

I saw Dr. N. yesterday for the second opinion and he said I have a cataract. He did a test on me where I looked through a pinhole and could see 20/20 which confirms it! This means the lens in my eye has become cloudy over the years. It’s a relatively easy outpatient surgery to remove my lens and place a new one in my eye which should give me 20/20 vision so I no longer need to wear glasses! I can hardly believe this news. I have worn thick glasses since I was 6 years old and have uncorrected vision of 20/1000.

April 8, 2006

Beloved, now are we the children of God, and it does not yet appear what we shall be, but we know that when He shall appear, we shall be like Him, for we shall see Him as He is. I John 3:2

I had my left cataract removed two days ago. I returned to the eye doctor’s office yesterday to have my patch removed. It was an amazing experience as the whole world appears so bright with beautiful colors, and I can see 20/20! Dr. E. said my vision might not stay quite 20/20 after the lens settles in. I can hardly believe the difference in all the colors. It’s like the yellow haze was removed. I think it’s a little taste of how beautiful everything will appear in heaven when I see the Lord and have my new body. Even so, COME, Lord Jesus!”  Revelation 22:20

April 20, 2006

So much has changed since I last wrote. I’m having a terrible time with nausea and headaches because I see two different sizes with each eye. I wear a contact lens in my right eye that still has the cataract. My brain is having a hard time adjusting to 20/20 vision in my newly implanted lens. Then I got a head cold and was so sick that I missed all the Easter services which was sad. This is my third week off of work, so my Dad flew up from Florida to help me out. Dr. E. is on vacation so I saw his partner who told me to patch my right eye and learn to drive and work with one eye. He also said to call Dr. E. to do the other eye as soon as possible.

I drove down the highway with one eye patched which was really scary since I have no depth perception. I asked my Dad to drive home which was just as scary. He has a shuffling gait and can’t remember directions at all. His hearing has also decreased. I think he has early dementia or Parkinson’s disease which is so sad. (See previous post.) He went with me to prayer meeting last night for which I was thankful. On the way home, the stars and glare around all the oncoming headlights was awful. I wonder if I will be able to drive at night anymore? Maybe that will go away once I’m off all the eye drops. I called Human Resources at work to check on short term disability, but they said I don’t have it since I haven’t worked there a year yet. God always provides and won’t test me above what I can bear.

It was difficult to drive with only one eye because I had no depth perception.

I’m thankful for this extra time with my Dad as we look at the beautiful spring flowers in bloom, walk through the woods together, and see historic sites nearby.

My Dad came to help me for 3 weeks. We enjoyed seeing all the spring flowers in bloom.

May 9, 2006

The Lord upholds all who fall, and raises up all who are bowed down. Psalm 145:14

How I praise God for the work He has done in my life the past few weeks. Dr. E. removed my right cataract on May 4, four weeks after my left cataract was removed. The next day after the patch was removed, my eyes began working together. We also stopped the Nevanac (NSAID) eye drop which was causing the nausea. What a relief to be rid of the nausea! It was such a joy to rejoin the choir yesterday at church and sing The Solid Rock.

When darkness veils His lovely face, I rest on His unchanging grace;

In every high and stormy gale, My anchor holds within the veil.

On Christ, the solid Rock I stand – all other ground is sinking sand,

All other ground is sinking sand.    –by Edward Mote

Christ is my solid Rock!

Reflection

How I thank God every day for giving me corrected unclouded vision. I later was told I developed cataracts at the age of 51 because I have a disorder which caused calcium deposits to cloud my lenses.  I still need to wear thin glasses to read to correct my astigmatism. One of the unexpected treats is to be able to see clearly when I go swimming. I can still drive at night as the glare and stars around all the headlights went away once I finished the eye drops. But most of all, I look forward to that day when I will see my dear Savior face to face in heaven above with perfect vision in my new body.

 

 

 

S-O-A-P Charting

March, 1978 – 11:30 p.m.

I had just finished walking rounds with the night shift nurse, clocked out, and sat down beside the chart rack to begin my charting before I could go home. I usually was able to complete some of my assigned five patient charts during my shift, but it had been nonstop all evening so I barely had time to gulp down my dinner. Each nurse was assigned five charts and must chart on two of the patient problems before going home. We were not paid overtime to complete our charting.

I wearily began writing using the S-O-A-P format in the heavy 3 inch thick chart under the tab marked “Nurses Notes” with my blue ink pen. Day shift charted in black ink, evening shift used blue ink, and night shift used red ink.

S is for subjective- what the patient says. soap bar

O is for objective – what you observe.

A is for assessment.

P is for plan.

I remembered my college instructor’s words about charting.

“If it’s not charted, it’s not done. Try to paint a concise picture with words of exactly what you did using only approved abbreviations. If you are ever sued, you likely won’t remember the patient several years from now. The lawyers and jury will scrutinize your every word.”

Mrs. K. in Room 515 had had a below the knee amputation two days previously. I scanned her problem list and chose Pain and Diabetes from her list. I began writing using approved abbreviations:

#1. Pain

S: c/o moderate RLE pain. (complains of moderate right lower extremity pain)

O: RLE incision intact. Moderate swelling, slight erythema. VS (vital signs): 99.2-76-18-136/84. (temperature-pulse-respiratory rate-blood pressure)

WBC (white blood cell count) 7.4. Given 2 Percocet.

A: Moderate post-op pain. Pain relieved with Percocet. No sign of infection.

P: Continue to monitor incision qs (every shift), medicate for pain prn (as needed). Instruct pt (patient) about phantom pain.

I completed my last chart at midnight, put on my coat, walked out to the parking lot, climbed in my car, and drove home through the black night.

Reflection

Charting has changed over the years, but the saying of my instructor still holds true in the litigious American society, “If it isn’t charted, it isn’t done.” After Xerox copies were invented, we switched to black ink for charting so the notes were more legible when copies were made.

When I worked in labor and delivery, I had to write my initials and time on the fetal monitor strip whenever I entered the mother’s room, and whenever I gave any medication or did a procedure. Only once was I called to the office of the hospital attorney to review my charting I did on a mother who we sent home in false labor. She later came back that night, but delivered the baby in the hospital parking lot before she made it to the labor and delivery unit. She was now suing the hospital for sending her home, and I was the nurse who did the last assessment. I reviewed my charting about a year after the incident and my instructor’s words came back to my memory. Thankfully, my charting was complete and I never heard the outcome of the lawsuit. They likely settled out of court.

When I was a visiting nurse in the 1990’s, we used a check list system for the daily visits and left a carbon copy in the home for the next nurse. When I worked in the nursing home as a nurse practitioner, we had a dictation service with secretaries which worked very well. We returned once again to the S-O-A-P format. We used both paper charts and electronic medical records which was confusing at times.

In my final job with the federal government, we only had an electronic patient record. The days of heavy paper charts in racks had ceased. I had machine dictation which was only about 70% accurate, so it took quite awhile to correct all the mistakes. But at least we  could read everyone’s notes and never had to go hunting for lost charts. However, when the computer system crashed, it shut down the whole system because we had no access to the patient records. Thankfully, that didn’t happen often. I felt sorry for the providers who had never taken a typing class and had to spend long hours at home in the evening completing their patient’s charts for the day with the old hunt and peck method of typing.

When I called a doctor’s office to request a copy of a patient’s records, his assistant said she would fax them over, but warned me we would not be able to read his handwriting! Over the years, I’m afraid my handwriting has deteriorated also as I have spent countless hours writing in patient charts. Charting isn’t the most satisfying part of nursing, but it is necessary for communication and a required part of every job, so I always tried to do it thoroughly and above all, honestly, to honor God.

“Not with eyeservice, as menpleasers, but as the servants of Christ, doing the will of God from the heart, with good will doing service as to the Lord, and not to men.” Ephesians 6:6-7

When I toured hospitals in China in 1986, I was amazed that they only had one sheet of paper with a few characters on a clipboard hanging on the end of each patient’s bed. The patients were not allowed to sue their provider, so the documentation was very minimal. A Chinese friend told me each person keeps their own medical record in a notebook and takes it with them each time they go to the clinic for the doctor to write in. It sure seems like a much simpler system!

 

Come Aside and Rest A While

Summer – 1976 – Midwest USA

I started out the summer working as a Nursing Assistant at Children’s Hospital where I had my clinicals last summer. They floated me one day to the burn unit and the nurse asked me to watch her do the dressings on a 2 year old so I could do them the next time with her watching. As a senior nursing student, they allowed me to do some procedures under close supervision. The little boy stood in his crib as she began to unwind his dressings. As the burned skin was exposed, his blood ran down his legs and arms and he began to scream. I felt myself begin to black out and turned and sank into a nearby chair and put my head on my knees. After the blackness cleared, I stood up and went out into the hallway. The nurse finished the dressings and came out into the hallway to speak with me. I said, “I’m so sorry, but I thought I was going to faint. I have never witnessed anything like that before.” She said she understood and told the supervisor not to assign me to the burn unit again. They sent me back to the orthopedic unit where I was last summer. I guess I deal better with the kids in traction than the burned ones.

After 4 weeks of arising at 5 a.m. in order to catch the 6:30 a.m. bus to work, the dizziness, nausea, and weariness was almost unbearable. I could not smile at anyone and my soul was crying in agony to God. I felt like Elijah under the juniper tree crying out to God to take him home. (I Kings 19:4-7) My Pastor was very concerned about me and asked me to take a walk with him before church Sunday night. “Pam, I think you are so rigid right now and have planned everything so much that God can’t work. Let go, and let God do whatever He wants! For one week, don’t plan anything. Take every day as it comes and do everything the opposite you usually do. Go out to a restaurant and eat a meal, listen to the birds, take long walks in the woods. Don’t study your Bible for one week except to read a few verses in the morning.  It will make you a better Bible student in the long run.”

His words were quite a shock to me, but I was willing to try anything since I had lost all joy in the Lord. The next weekend, I drove up to see Jane for one night and we went hiking at the state park. I had to stop every 30 feet to rest a little. When I awoke on Monday, I was still so dizzy and exhausted that I called in sick. After praying about it the rest of the day, I decided I needed to resign and return to my parents’ home to rest the remainder of the summer. I called the head nurse and told her the situation, and she said she understood. After 7 quarters straight of school, with the last one in psychiatry and the demanding classes, my body was beyond exhausted.

My parents were very concerned about me also and were extremely kind to me. After 2 weeks of total rest, I began to feel like myself again and could smile and laugh! I just finished reading a little book by M. R. DeHaan MD called Broken Things. He said, “The Lord only breaks those whom He is going to make.” “Sunshine all the time makes a desert.” I understand better now that I don’t need to strive and push doors open, but just relax and let the Lord open or close the doors. His tenderness in giving me 2 months just to meditate and enjoy Him brings tears to my eyes.

My Dad kindly drove our travel trailer to the state park a couple hours away and set it up so my Mom and I could stay for the week while he returned to work. God has given my Mom and me very precious times together. I so enjoy walking through the woods listening to the rustling leaves, watching the butterflies and dragonflies fly from flower to flower. At night, the chirping crickets lull me to sleep, and the singing birds awaken me every morning. How I thank God for these precious blessings and restoring my health!

Camping at the State Park was so relaxing!

Camping at the State Park was so relaxing!

Reflection

Since 1976, I have had several other times in my life of total exhaustion when I have simply burned the candle at both ends and pushed my body too far.  As I read the passage in I Kings again about Elijah, he had just run for his life 93 miles to flee wicked Queen Jezebel who was trying to kill him! No wonder he was exhausted. After he said to God, “It is enough! Now, O Lord, take away my life; for I am not better than my fathers.” And as he lay and slept under a juniper tree, behold, an angel touched him and said unto him, Arise and eat. And he ate and then slept some more and ate some more. He was able to go 40 days and nights after that. Now I realize I am certainly not Elijah, but the cure was the same for me. Sleep and eat, sleep and eat.

The disciples were deeply grieving after burying their beloved friend, John the Baptist, who was beheaded by wicked King Herod. I love the passage in Mark 6:30-31which says And the apostles gathered themselves together unto Jesus, and told Him all things, both what they had done, and what they had taught. And He said unto them, Come aside into a desert place, and rest a while; for there were many coming and going, and they had no leisure so much as to eat.” It’s so wonderful that our dear Savior sees when we need to rest and provides it for us!

trillium

3 petaled trillium wild flower reminds me of the Trinity!

A restful walk in the woods.

A restful walk in the woods with my sister, Marsha.

January, 2018

I am currently recovering from pneumonia and a horrific reaction to a medicine that put me in the hospital for 12 days. As I slowly regain my strength, I will repeat some of my most popular posts. Please pray for me to learn all the lessons God has for me during this time of recovery. I praise Him that He has made the Bible extremely precious to me as I lean hard on Him. The medicine caused some short term memory loss which was terrifying to me, but God quieted my heart when I remembered 2 Timothy 1:7, “For God has not given us the spirit of fear, but of power, and of love, and of a sound mind.” 

If you have any encouraging Bible verses that you want to share with me and other readers here, please post them in the Comments section. May you have a blessed week of “Looking unto Jesus, the author and finisher of our faith.” Hebrews 12:2.

Pamela, APRN

Nurses’ Health Study Research Results

December, 2017

Nearly 30 years ago I decided to join the Nurses’ Health Study and complete a 30 minute questionnaire about my habits and life style every two years. In the beginning, I colored in the little circles in black pencil on a computerized answer sheet and mailed it back to them, but now I do it online. They have kept up with me through my many moves so I haven’t been lost in the shuffle. I am in the second cohort of thousands of nurses called NHS2. They now have a third group of younger nurses born on or after January 1, 1965. If you are a RN, LPN, or nursing student born then and would like to participate, please do your part to continue this wonderful ground breaking research and sign up at www.nhs3.org . They are especially recruiting male nurses. They have also recruited and followed the children of NHS2 nurses to see the maternal influence on their children as they age. They like to recruit nurses because we are reliable and honest in reporting our life style. All our years of charting about our patients is definitely a benefit to this research!

Physical Activity and Heart Disease in Women

Middle-aged and older women who are more physically active have significantly lower rates of coronary heart disease (CHD). Women who walked briskly for at least 2.5 hours per week saw a 35% lower risk of developing CHD.

Get your walking in!

NSAIDS and acetaminophen may increase risk of hearing loss in women

Two-thirds of women in their sixties suffer from hearing loss. Among 55,850 women in a subgroup, using NSAID (Ibuprofen, Motrin, Aleve are common over the counter names) for over 6 years was associated with a 10% increased risk of hearing loss. Use of acetaminophen (Tylenol is common brand name) for over 6 years showed a 9% increased risk of hearing loss. There was a 7% higher risk of hearing loss in women who used either of these more than two days per week. However, duration of use of aspirin was not associated with hearing loss. They are doing more research in this area.

Diet Quality and Physical Functioning

It is important to maintain physical function as we age. They compared those with the healthiest diets with less healthy diets and found the group with better diets were 13% less likely to develop physical impairment. Higher intake of fruits and vegetables, and lower intake of sugar-sweetened beverages, trans-fats, and sodium were associated significantly with less physical impairment as they aged. The strongest positive relations were found with increased intake of oranges, orange juice, apples, pears, romaine or leaf lettuce, and walnuts.

Gluten Free (GF) Diets

GF diets have increased in popularity due to concerns about celiac disease and gluten allergies. However, little research has been done to explore how GF diets impact people without celiac disease. NHS found that eating foods high in gluten from whole grains can be beneficial to health. Men and women with the highest levels of gluten intake had 20% lower risk of developing diabetes, and 15% less risk of developing coronary heart disease. Gluten intake did not lead to weight gain in people under age 65.

Maintaining a Healthy Weight

They examined which specific foods and eating patterns led to less weight gain and more weight gain as we age.

These foods were associated with less weight gain: tofu, soy, plain or artificially sweetened yogurt, seafood, fruit (especially blueberries, prunes, apples, pears strawberries, grapefruit, and avocados). Chicken without skin, replacing 1 serving daily of sugar sweetened beverage with coffee or water, vegetables (especially cauliflower, summer squash, string beans, broccoli, and green leafy vegetables), replacing 1 serving daily of fruit juice with coffee or water, eating nuts (especially peanut butter, peanuts, and walnuts).

Eat your fruits and veggies for your health!

These foods were associated with more weight gain: corn, processed meats, peas, chicken with skin, sugar-sweetened beverages, baked, boiled, or mashed potatoes, fruit juice, regular full-fat cheese.

The American Journal of Public Health published a special edition in September 2016 to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Nurse’s Health Study which is still available.

I hope you will incorporate these findings into your own life style and instruct your patients so everyone can be healthier!

But even more important than physical health is spiritual health. I thank Jesus Christ that He has satisfied the deepest hunger of my heart. “And Jesus said unto them, I am the bread of life; he that comes to Me shall never hunger, and he that believes on Me shall never thirst.” John 6:35

Jesus is the spiritual bread of life.

 

 

Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving, 2017

“In everything give thanks, for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus concerning you.” I Thessalonians 5:18

Dear Readers,

It seems hard to believe that I began writing this blog four years ago after attending a Christian writer’s conference. My goals in recording what God has taught me during nearly 40 years of nursing is to glorify Him, encourage Christian nurses, and reveal to young people what nursing is all about.  I pray godly Christians will enter the field with realistic expectations.

As many baby boomers like myself retire, we need young men and women to fill the ranks who will give compassionate excellent care to their patients from a heart filled with Christ’s love. Nursing was often a challenging and difficult occupation, but the rewards were great whenever I had the opportunity to point one of my patients to my dear Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ.

I thank the Lord for each of you who come from over 130 countries around the world. When I began to write this blog, I didn’t know if anyone would ever read it, but nearly 7000 people have now discovered it. The main countries where you, my readers, reside are USA, Brazil, Canada, United Kingdom, Philippines, Germany, India, Australia, Italy, and France. Thank you for those of you who have told others about my blog. I’m hoping that I will have time to complete recording my nursing career journey over the next months.

I retired 18 months ago, but have been busy ever since with Spanish language school for seven months, relocating, and several travel trips thrown in there. People warned me that retirement could be busy, and I have found that to be the case! But it has been  enjoyable to make new friends in different corners of the world. I thank God for a good measure of health He has given me.

As we celebrate my favorite holiday here in the USA, Thanksgiving, I thank the Lord for each of you. I pray you will receive the Lord Jesus Christ as your personal Savior if you have not already done so. If I can answer any questions you may have about salvation or pray for you specifically, please email me at pamela.aprn@gmail.com.   For those of you who are fellow believers, may you continue to grow in His grace and keep ” looking unto Jesus, the author and finisher of our faith…” Hebrews 12:2. 

Happy Thanksgiving!

thanksgiving

Prayer for Our Veterans

Nurse Case Manager

I dialed the phone and on the third ring, an elderly man answered in a deep gravelly voice. “Hello?”

“Hi, Mr. G, I am your nurse case manager from the veterans’ clinic and work with your doctor. Your veterans’ clinic home care  nurse said that you came back to your assisted living apartment from the nursing home today, so Welcome Home!”

Mr. G. sadly replied, “I wish I was still in the nursing home. They were so nice to me there. I won’t take any pills until my nurse, Jane, comes here and puts them in my pill box!”

“Mr. G, I’m afraid the nurse from Medicare has to see you for a few weeks first until you are stable, and then Jane will be back.”

“But I don’t like the Medicare nurse! I love Jane. She’s wonderful! I fought in World War II for this country and gave this country the best years of my life. If it weren’t for guys like me, you would be speaking German or Japanese right now! I should be given the nurse I want! Why are you dumping me now???” he shouted into the phone.

I took a deep breath and prayed silently, “Dear Lord, give me the right words for this dear veteran. Help me to explain the rules to him.” “Mr. G, Jane is not allowed to see you twice a week like you need right now. She is only permitted to see you once or twice a month after you are stable for health maintenance visits. Please let the other nurse come to visit you for a few weeks, and then Jane will come back. If you don’t like the Medicare nurse, call me and I will ask the agency to send a different nurse.”

“Well, OK. If that’s how it has to be. I’m so lonely ever since my wife died and went to heaven to be with the Lord. I’ll be glad when I see the Lord Jesus Christ and her again. Thank you for your help, Pam. You’re OK! Could I tell you one more thing? God loves you, and so do I!”

My eyes filled with tears. “I love you too, Mr G.” I slowly hung up the phone and prayed,

Dear Father, Thank you for all our veterans who served our country. Thank You for the freedom I have in the USA. Bless and strengthen and protect our troops right now around the world. I pray that each one would look to you and receive Jesus Christ as their personal Savior. Amen.

Thank You, Lord, for our Veterans!

Thank You, Lord, for our Veterans!

Reflection

Mr G. died the next year at the age of 93. I thank the Lord for him and our other veterans that I might enjoy the freedom I have here in the USA. As a nurse case manager working for the federal government, it was sometimes very challenging to explain the complex rules and insurance regulations of the various programs available to veterans. As we honor our veterans here in the USA on November 11, I pray God would bless and strengthen them.

I hope you watch the following video about a dear World War 2 veteran, Harry Walmer, who gave much for his country. I have had the pleasure of meeting him and thanking him for his service. Despite his 100% disability from the war, he continues to rejoice in the Lord Jesus Christ and looks forward to that day when he will go to heaven to be with his Savior.

Harry Walmer story

I also pray that we would all be good soldiers of the cross for the Lord Jesus Christ as we are in a spiritual warfare daily. May we be able to echo with the Apostle Paul, “I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith; Henceforth there is laid up for me a crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, shall give me at that day; and not to me only, but unto all them also that love His appearing.” 2 Timothy 4:7-8