Nursing Tour of China – Part 3

To Xian, China – June 5, 1986

We’re on the plane this morning from Nanjing to Xian in western China. There was a quick change of plans, so we will not be seeing the Nanjing bridge. I thank the Lord because this will give me an extra day in Xian. I hope to see Mrs. Li, wife of one of the University students I know back in the Midwest. I also hope to visit Mr & Mrs P who are Christian Americans who have been teaching English in a college in Xian for two years. I just read in John 15:15 how Jesus is my best friend. I’m so glad He is with me all the way!

Henceforth I call you not servants; for the servant knoweth not what his lord doeth: but I have called you friends; for all things that I have heard of my Father I have made known unto you.

Right now I’m listening to my micro recorder play the wonderful hymn, “Savior like a shepherd lead us; Much we need Thy tender care. In Thy pleasant pastures feed us; For our use Thy folds prepare. Blessed Jesus, blessed Jesus, Thou hast bought us Thine we are.”

So far, I’ve given out about ten gospels of John with tracts. It’s frustrating because the tour is so packed with activities that I can’t find time to get out and meet the people. Our communist agent is with us every step of the way monitoring our every move so we don’t talk with the people too much. I think I’m going to drop out of some of the activities in Xian since we won’t be going to a hospital.

The city tour guides we have had so far are really excellent with such a sense of humor! They speak English very well, especially considering that most of them have never left the country. There are English lessons on all the government run TV stations so everyone has an opportunity to learn basic English.

It has been fun to bargain with some of the shopkeepers. They are very persistent and even follow me down the street if I walk away without buying anything. Free trade seems to be taking hold in China. Several of the nurses have also visited Russia. Their observation is that the Chinese have much more freedom than the Russians.

I love the children – they are so cute! The parents are so proud of their one child. It seems like it could become a child centered society quickly. Several times we have seen them chattering away as they walk hand in hand through museums.

Time for the plane to land! This plane has no seat-belts and open overhead bins. The stewardess has walked up and down the aisle the entire trip handing out fans, snacks, and small bottles of oil that are supposed to cure everything. I thank the Lord that we are here safely!xian1

11 p.m.

Praise God! I was able to see Mrs. Li tonight! Carla, my roommate, and I took a taxi to her apartment. It was a scary ride as the driver didn’t believe on turning on his headlights except for a moment at the intersection. He slowed down slightly, flashed on his lights, looked both ways, and then zoomed through after turning out his headlights again! We were praying for safety the whole way! But the driver was kind to walk us up four flights of stairs and find Mrs. Li’s door in the dark hallway. The door was not clearly marked, so we never would have found her without his help.

She lives with her parents, and her new baby boy in two rooms with one dim light bulb hanging from the ceiling. We could barely see each other, but they were so warm and welcoming to us! I was able to give Mrs. Li several gifts from her husband for their new baby (who he has yet to see), and give her photos of her husband that I took before I left. Her baby had little pieces of tape on his ear to hold the acupuncture needles in place because he has been ill.

Mrs. Li tends her new baby boy.

Mrs. Li tends her new baby boy.

They called a translator to come and help us who works at the Xian Hotel. We are staying nearby at an old Russian hotel called the People’s Hotel. I wasn’t sure if he was a Communist block parent or not. While Carla talked with him, I shared the gospel with Mrs. Li in Chinese. I recited John 3:16 and showed it to her in the gospel of John that I gave her. I’m not sure how much she understood, but I ask the Lord to take my stumbling words and make them clear to her. She is coming to meet me tomorrow at my hotel and send some things back to her husband through me.

The translator volunteered to try and track down Mr & Mrs P for me tomorrow. It is nearly impossible to get connections on the telephones here because they are so unreliable just as Mr S, my Chinese teacher, warned me. I do pray it would work out!

Xian, June 7, 1986

This is my least favorite hotel so far. It is a dingy old gray cinder block building with threadbare worn dark red carpet throughout and a musty smell of stale garlic. Carla and I left the light on in the bathroom all night to keep the cockroaches from running all over us!

This morning, we went to see the buried army of terra cotta soldiers which was impressive. As farmers were digging a water well in 1974, they uncovered numerous life size clay warriors that were buried around 300 B.C. to take care of their emperor in his afterlife.  They were painted in bright colors when they were buried with intricate facial details. Twelve years later, they have only begun to uncover the estimated 8000 man army complete with horses and chariots. It was interesting to see the archaeologists work as we watched from a platform suspended above them under a large canopy which was built to protect the work site. This has become a major tourist attraction in China. The government has not had time to build enough hotels to keep up with the demand.

Uncovered Terra Cotta Army of Soldiers.

Uncovered Terra Cotta Army of Soldiers.

Afterwards, we bargained for things in the nearby market. I found the noodle stand fascinating! I watched him make the noodles, boil them, and then serve them in a bowl with a pair of wooden chopsticks. After the person finished eating, he gave the bowl and sticks a quick wipe with a towel, refilled the bowl, and handed them to the next person in line. We were instructed not to buy any food from the street stands to avoid food sickness. They tend to eat noodles made of wheat here in the north rather than rice which is grown in southern China.

Noodle Stand

Noodle Stand

Wheat Fields in Northern China.

Wheat Fields in Northern China.

Then we visited the beautiful Hua Qing Hot Springs. I had fun watching 3 boys play in some large red pots!xian spring Pam xian spring

Hua Xing Hot Springs

Hua Qing Hot Springs

When I returned to the hotel, Mr P telephoned me! The translator was able to contact him today somehow. Mr. P told the clerk at the hotel desk what to tell my taxi driver, so I arrived without mishap in the daylight. I asked the driver to wait while I visited with Mr & Mrs P for about an hour. They gave me a tour of the small campus which has recently opened and is quite primitive compared to American colleges. They have two small children and had no heat last winter where the temperatures plummet to zero degrees regularly. They were finally able to obtain some coal heaters. The five other Americans teaching here all got frostbite.

They each teach about 15 students and then combine their classes several times a week for group activities. The teachers aren’t allowed to mention God in the classroom, but can speak with the students who approach them after class. They are only allowed to give out Bibles when a student asks for one. The students talk freely with them and are resentful that the government has assigned each of them to be a teacher, giving them no choice of an occupation. They are also upset that they are only permitted to have one child after they marry.

Another challenge is the close living quarters of the English teachers in the compound. Conflicts arise because they all have strong personalities. When the Americans leave the compound, there is quite a bit of anti-foreigner feelings among the Chinese. But all the teachers have a heart to truly give the gospel of Jesus Christ to each student and are willing to endure the difficult living circumstances.

Reflection

As I look back on Xian, this city was my least favorite of the ones I was able to visit, but it is where the Lord blessed the most in actual contacts with the people. I was able to meet Mrs. Li again the next year when she came to the Midwest to visit her husband at the university. The government made her leave the baby behind with her parents to ensure that both parents would return to China. Mr. Li’s son was 3 years old when he finally met him for the first time in China. He made a great sacrifice of missing his only child’s first years to obtain an American education.

Advertisements

Nursing Tour of China – Part 2

Shanghai & Nanjing, China – 1986

June 3 – Shanghai

I was too tired to write last night and am weary again tonight, so I have a feeling this will be a short journal! Yesterday we went to our first hospital tour in Shanghai. We met in a large boardroom first where they told us about the hospital and served us loose-leaf fragrant Jasmine tea in china mugs with a lid to keep it hot. We learned to sip it through our teeth so we didn’t swallow the tea leaves! They told us some health statistics in China compared to the USA.

Nursing in China

Nursing in China

Xin Hua Hospital

Xin Hua Hospital

Entrance to Hospital

Entrance to Hospital

Then we toured the pediatric ward. They have a few pieces of new equipment, but it looks pretty antiquated otherwise – about 1950 era.

Pediatric patient with scalp IV

Pediatric patient with scalp IV

Rubber reusable IV tubing with glass drip chamber and glass bottles.

Rubber reusable IV tubing with glass drip chamber and glass bottles.

Baby under oxygen hood

Baby under oxygen hood

Infant nursery. Note oxygen tank against the wall

Infant nursery. Note oxygen tank against the wall

Nurse's station

Nurse’s station

English lessons for the older children.

English lessons for the older children.

I was excited to talk with Dr. X, a pediatric cardiothoracic surgeon, and give him a gospel of John tucked inside my hospital’s magazine. How I pray he would read the gospel of John and receive Jesus Christ as his personal Savior. He is going to Canada next month to study for a year.

Chinese English Gospel of John I gave Dr X

Chinese English Gospel of John I gave Dr X

Jesus said unto her, I am the resurrection and the life; he that believes in Me, though he were dead, yet shall he live. And whosoever lives and believes in Me shall never die. Believest thou this? John 11:25-26

Then they served us an elegant lunch at the Seaman’s Club overlooking the harbor. We had the unique experience of eating “1000 year old eggs”! They explained how they hard boil the eggs, remove the shell, and bury them in some type of mud until the egg turns black. It was OK, but one was enough! Then on to the Yu Garden with the zig zag bridge which was very pretty, even though there are no flowers in the garden. (I later learned the Communists think flowers are capitalistic.)

Zig Zag bridge to Yu Garden

Zig Zag bridge to Yu Garden

We then strolled through the fascinating old city before boarding our first class train car to Suzhou, the city of silk.

The train was so interesting with 2 seats facing each other with a small lace-covered table between us with a potted plant in the middle. There was carpet on the floor and overhead ceiling fans which made it very comfortable. We again enjoyed tea served by the stewardess.

First Class Train to Suzhou

First Class Train to Suzhou

Suzhou - City of Silk

Suzhou – City of Silk

Suzhou canals just like Venice!

Suzhou canals just like Venice!

Today in Suzhou we saw the silk spinning factory and embroidery factory and another garden. At the silk factory, they put the silk cocoons in very hot water and the women stand all day taking one thread from each  cocoon and threading it on to a large spool to unwind the cocoon. It was 95 degrees in the factory and the women are required to work 12 hour shifts.

Ladies unwind silk cocoons in 95 degree heat

Ladies unwind silk cocoons in 95 degree heat

In the embroidery factory, teen girls do this incredibly detailed silk embroidery which they copy from oil paintings. They showed us eye exercises they did, but there were no older women there because it caused such eye strain.

Young girls do intricate silk embroidery

Young girls do intricate silk embroidery

Then we took a 4 hour train ride to Nanjing. We had fun visiting on the train and getting to know each other better.There are 20 nurses total with 4 of their husbands who joined us. The new hotel where we are staying is very nice with an excellent dinner.

Chinese traditional instrument band

Chinese traditional instrument band

A Chinese band played traditional instruments. In honor of us Americans, they played Jingle Bells, Oh Susanna, and Elvis’ Love Me Tender. It seemed a little strange to hear Jingle Bells in June! Time for bed- my eyes are drooping.

Nanjing, June 4

It’s a sunny 80 degrees today which I thoroughly enjoyed. I slept well which gave me a little more energy. We started out by climbing up 392 steps to Dr. Sun Yat Sen’s tomb. Whew!  I made it without too much trouble. The view of the rolling green hills was so beautiful.

Dr. Sun Yat Sen's Mausoleum. "George Washington" of China

Dr. Sun Yat Sen’s Mausoleum. “George Washington” of China

nan6

87 year old friendly lady had just climbed 392 steps!

I met a very friendly 87 year-old lady on the way down who held my hand as we had our photo taken together. She had just climbed all those steps also! (I later found out that Dr Sun Yat Sen was a professing Christian who was the first president of China after deposing the last emperor in 1911. He is considered the “George Washington” of China.)

After visiting Ming tombs and drinking plum juice at the former summer home of Madame Chiang Kaishek, we had lunch at the hotel and then toured a second pediatric hospital. It was much like the one in Shanghai except our nurse guides asked us more questions. Their nursing research department was very impressive!nan hosp1 nan hosp8

Our friendly nurse tour guides!

Our friendly nurse tour guides!

Patient laundry hanging out to dry.

Patient laundry hanging out to dry.

We stopped for a few minutes at a tall drum tower where a class of 5 year old children were also touring. They were so cute as they walked hand in hand through the tower!

Children tour the drum tower.

Children tour the drum tower.

Typical Nanjing street corner.

Typical Nanjing street corner with “bendable” city bus in background.

Then we ate dinner and went to a variety show. It was lots of fun with a string quartet, singers, a kungfu demonstration, and a hilarious bird imitator. My eyes are closing fast.

Reflection

I still receive Christmas cards from one of the couples who were on the tour and from the Nanjing nurse guide who later moved to the USA. I have visited her twice in North Carolina. I was thrilled to hear how she went back to college to receive her BSN and is doing very well working at a major university hospital. Her daughter has grown up and has also graduated from college. Two of the nurses on the tour married the following year and I was invited to both their weddings. It was quite amazing how quickly our tour group bonded!

 

Nursing Tour of China – Part I

May 31, 1986 – Midwest, USA to Shanghai, China

I arose at 4:30 a.m. in the Midwest and caught a 7 a.m. flight to LaGuardia airport in New York City. I waited 2 hours for the free bus to take me to JFK, but it never came. Finally, I decided to split a cab with a man who was in the same dilemma. I would have missed my flight to China except that it was delayed 2 hours. The tour director was frantic with worry about what had happened to me!

We left JFK at 1 p.m. New York time and arrived in Shanghai at 10 p.m. Saturday, China time after a 3 hour layover in Tokyo, Japan. China is 12 hours ahead of New York time. It’s now past midnight and I have been awake 35 hours because I couldn’t sleep at all on the plane. My feet are swollen, but otherwise I’m fine. We are staying at the beautiful Cypress Hotel on the outskirts of the city. I think pure adrenaline and excitement carried me here! It’s hard to believe I’m actually in China after beginning to plan the trip 9 months ago.

Lobby of the beautiful Cypress Hotel

Lobby of the beautiful Cypress Hotel

My roommate, Carla, is a psychiatric nurse who lives in New York City and is also single. She is about 15 years older than me and very pleasant. Her legs are swollen too. We each have a twin bed and private bathroom we share. We like the thermos of hot water beside our  bed with china tea cups! We both decided to put our head at the foot of our bed so we could prop our heels on the wall above the headboard over our heads to try and drain our legs! We named this “the China position!”

I read Psalm 63:1-2 tonight, “O God, thou art my God, early will I seek Thee; my soul thirsts for Thee, my flesh longs for Thee in a dry and thirsty land, where no water is, to see Thy power and Thy glory, as I have seen Thee in the sanctuary.” May God help me to give the water of life to thirsty souls.

June 1, Sunday, Shanghai, China – Children’s Day

“The idols of the nations are silver and gold, the work of men’s hands.” Psalm 135:15. Today was the Lord’s day, but I couldn’t go to  church as I had hoped, because they wouldn’t allow me to leave the tour group. It hasn’t even seemed like a day of worship because we have been constantly on the go since our American style breakfast of 2 fried eggs and toast at 7 a.m.

There are bicycles everywhere and large buses that bend in the middle when they go around a corner. The buses are mobbed with people which look overwhelming to me! There are only 600 cars in all of Shanghai which has 7 million people. The cars are mostly for the Communist party leaders. I am glad we have our own little air-conditioned tour bus with our city guide and country guide, Mr. Li. Mr. Li is part of the Communist party and will be with us the entire 2 weeks to make sure we don’t talk with the people too much and watch our every move.

Bicycles everywhere!

Bicycles everywhere!

The Bund - "Wall Street" of China

The Bund – “Wall Street” of China

We went to the Bund this morning, which is the former Wall Street of China where all the bank buildings were located before the Communist takeover in 1949. It is a pretty park along the River and was mobbed with parents showing off their one child for Children’s Day. The Chinese are only allowed to have one child by law because the country has such a huge population. Interestingly, they do not celebrate Mother’s Day or Father’s Day.

A proud father holds his pretty daughter on Children's Day

A proud father holds his pretty daughter on Children’s Day

About 20 people came up to me and started practicing speaking English with me. I stand out in the crowd since I am tall and Caucasian. Since foreigners have only been recently allowed to visit China, I don’t think too many of them have ever seen a tall American woman before. I gave one man a Chinese-English gospel tract my Chinese teacher had translated for me. Everyone swarmed around us to try and read the tract at once which frightened me, so I walked away. I didn’t want to start a riot my first day in China!

We also saw the jade Buddha today. False worship is so depressing. The temple reminded me of a dead cathedral. We also viewed a pottery and bronze collection which doesn’t interest me much. It’s hard to get used to the Chinese idea of beauty. At lunch, the waiter taught me how to use chopsticks, and then we went to the arts and crafts center. I was amazed at the beautiful quality of the items and the inexpensive prices. I bought a gorgeous embroidered silk blouse for $10.

Then we ate dinner at the Park Hotel. They sat us at large circular tables of 8 with a large lazy Susan in the middle. We were each given a 5 inch diameter plate and pair of chopsticks. Then the waitresses brought out about 10 different dishes of interesting food and placed them on the lazy Susan. We took some of each dish with our chopsticks and kept refilling our little plate until we were full. No fruit, dairy, or dessert were ever served. Soup is always the last course.

Then on to the acrobatics and circus show. The giant panda was so cute and amazing as he rode a bicycle around the ring! The acrobats are incredibly flexible and did things I have never seen in the states. They dressed very modestly with long pants and high collars.

Shanghai Circus with amazing balancing act!

Shanghai Circus with amazing balancing act!

I am thankful I was able to give two Chinese gospels of John to the hotel attendants tonight. I’m so weary. I just hope I can grab some more time alone with the Lord in prayer and Bible study tomorrow.

Reflection

Even though my two weeks in China were constantly busy with no time to rest, it was so fascinating as all my senses were inundated with sights, sounds, and smells. I was so shocked by the density of the population with crowds of people everywhere! It was quite a contrast to the quiet farms of the Midwest where I grew up. I was so thankful God opened the door for me to go despite my eye situation and my mother’s cancer. (See previous post.)

Next post I will tell you about our visit to a Shanghai hospital, Suzhou – the city of silk, and Nanjing where we visited another hospital.

 

HAPPY NURSE’S DAY!!

May 6, 2015

To all my friends around the world who are nurses, may you have a blessed day in the Lord ministering and serving your patients! May God encourage you and strengthen you. This verse blessed me today as I read how the Lord Jesus Christ is interceding for each of His children. Wherefore, He is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by Him, seeing He ever lives to make intercession for them. Since I now have readers from nearly 100 countries, it would be wonderful to see your nursing graduate photo with your first name, year you graduated, and country! Kindly email me your photo at pamela.aprn@gmail.com and I will do a future post of all of you.

Pamela, RN - Class of 1977 - USA

Pamela, RN – Class of 1977 – USA

Here is our first reader photo! Thanks for sharing, Phyllis!

Phyllis RN - Class of 1985 USA

Phyllis RN – Class of 1985 USA

Another reader’s photo!

Gladys - Class of 1989 - USA

Gladys, LPN – Class of 1989 – USA

–Heartaches

January, 1986

I was sitting at my desk in staff development preparing to teach a class, when all of a sudden I saw flashing lights and it looked as if I was looking through wavy jello with a multitude of clear floaters. My ophthalmologist told me at my last eye exam that I am at high risk for retinal detachment because I am so nearsighted and my retina is very thin. I knew the flashing lights could be a sign of detachment, so I called immediately for an emergency eye exam. They told me to come right away. Thankfully I had finished teaching my orientation classes for the day, so my director told me to go at once.

The doctor dilated my eyes with drops and then began carefully examining my retina very thoroughly. It was hard to keep my eyes open with the very bright lights as tears streamed down my face. At the end, he said he could not find any holes in my retina, but that my vitreous was peeling off my retina, much like when you peel wallpaper off a wall. (The vitreous is the clear gel inside our eyeballs.) He said it would take about a year for my vitreous to totally detach. During this time, whenever I see flashing lights, I need to come immediately for an exam. If a hole develops in my retina, I need emergency surgery so I don’t go blind. My uncle has been totally blind for about 20 years from detached retinas.

I told him about my nursing tour of China in June, and asked him if I should cancel it? I also told him I have trip cancellation insurance and emergency evacuation by plane. He said if I could get to Hong Kong if I needed emergency eye surgery, I should be able to go. How I thank God for the precious eyesight He has given me! I’m afraid I take my eyesight for granted all too often.

March, 1986

The phone rang about 5 pm. It was my Dad. “Pam, I’m afraid your mother isn’t doing too well. She was swimming laps today at the indoor pool, when all of a sudden she turned yellow and started vomiting. They called the ambulance and took her to the local hospital where they admitted her. They did many tests and think something is blocking her bile ducts so they are going to do exploratory surgery first thing in the morning.” I said, “This doesn’t sound too good. I’m going to take the day off and come down tonight so I can be there tomorrow.”

I called my director, packed my bag, and jumped in my car to drive 100 miles to my parents’ home. The next morning, I went with my Dad and brother early to the hospital where I said goodby to Mom before they wheeled her into surgery. We then waited what seemed like forever in the waiting room. Finally, the surgeon walked in and said she had very fast growing tumors everywhere. He debulked the tumors as much as he could, and then hooked up her gall bladder to her small intestine to bypass her blocked bile ducts. He said it looked like it was cancer of the pancreas, but they would know for sure in a few days when the biopsy results came back. My Dad asked how long he thought she had to live? The doctor replied, “Possibly a few months.” We sat there in stunned silence as our tears fell. How could Mom go from swimming laps to being at death’s door in 24 hours?

The Lord is near unto those who are of a broken heart.

Psalm 34:18

Our hearts were broken over Mom's cancer

Our hearts were broken over Mom’s cancer

My biggest heartache is that I do not see any evidence that she has received Jesus Christ as her personal Savior. My sister and I have shared the gospel with her so many times over the years and have tried to be a good testimony to her, but it seems like our words fall on deaf ears.

Dear Father, Thank you that you love Mom so much more than I do and that You want everyone to receive your dear Son as their Savior. How I pray Mom would have the joy of knowing You and being forgiven of all her sins. I commit her into Your hands and thank You that You do all things well. In Christ’s Name I pray, Amen.

A few days later, my Dad called me and was jubilant! “The biopsy results came back and your Mom has lymphoma rather than cancer of the pancreas. It is Stage IV and very fast growing, but should respond well to chemotherapy, so they will give her chemo once a month for six months.” After we hung up, I got down on my knees and thanked God for His mercy. Having a treatable cancer like lymphoma was so much better than the untreatable cancer of the pancreas.

Easter weekend, April, 1986

I went home to spend Easter weekend with my parents. Mom was lying in bed because she was so weak from the chemo. We were enjoying watching an old movie together on TV when all of a sudden her teeth began chattering, and she asked me to get her more blankets. I felt her forehead, and it was burning hot. I put the thermometer in her mouth, and it registered 104 degrees! I knew this was an emergency and called her oncologist. He said to call the ambulance and get her to the hospital at once. The ambulance quickly arrived, and I rode up front while my Dad followed in his car. They admitted Mom directly to the oncology floor, checked her blood and urine, and then started an IV to give her fluids and antibiotics.

Her white blood count (WBC) had dropped dangerously low to 400. Normal is 4500-10000. The white blood cells are like the body’s soldiers which destroy any bacteria causing infection. Because Mom’s WBC’s were so low, she couldn’t fight the serious infection in her blood. A low WBC is a common side effect of chemotherapy because it destroys the healthy blood cells as well as the cancer cells. The next 24 hours would be critical.

By Sunday, Mom’s fever had broken and her WBC’s were starting to come up. After attending church Easter morning, we visited Mom who had been placed in isolation. My brother announced that he and his girlfriend had decided to get married. Mom congratulated him, and then said to me, “Pam, I want you to get married before I die!” and our tears began to fall. I was so exhausted from the entire weekend that I couldn’t answer her a word. I hugged Mom goodby and drove home the 100 miles so I could return to work Monday morning.

On Tuesday evening, my sister called me after she spoke with Mom who started crying again because she wants to see me happily married. Linda explained to Mom that it was much better to be single than married to the wrong person. After I asked the Lord for wisdom, I decided to write Mom a letter.

“For My thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways My ways, saith the Lord. For as the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways, and My thoughts than your thoughts.” Isaiah 55:8-9

Dear Mom,

I’m happy my brother is getting married, but please don’t be sad about the fact that I’m not married. The Lord is in control and knows what is best for me. If He wants me married, He will bring along the right man at the right time. If He chooses to leave me single, He will continue to supply my every need as He has in the past. When I feel lonely, I ask God to comfort me, and He always does. God is far more concerned about these things than you or I, so I must leave it in His hands. I have seen what happens when people scheme to “get” a husband, and it is always disastrous.

Some of the most beautiful godly marriages I have seen have been between older Christians. George and Letty Black were 38 years old when they met and married on the mission field. These lessons have not been easy for me to learn over the years as I’ve watched all my friends marry one by one. But God makes no mistakes and knows what is best. I love Him most of all, and simply want to do His will above all else, and walk by faith.

I continue to hold you up in prayer. Keep eating! May God strengthen you and give you understanding of His wonderful way.

Much Love in Christ, Pam

I hold the trip to China with an open hand. I’m willing to go or willing to stay. God’s will be done. Mom told me she still wants me to go to China so I can tell her all about it when I return.

Reflection

I realize this is a little longer post than usual, but I included it with the hope of encouraging those of you who are single. For any parents that may be reading this, I beg of you not to put pressure on your children to get married or make them feel like a failure if they aren’t married. Encourage them to grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ, because our relationship with Jesus Christ is the only one that lasts for all eternity. Marriage is only for  our days here on earth. May we all seek to glorify God, whether we are single or married!